terça-feira, 1 de abril de 2014

Sessão de treino de José Mourinho

FIRST SESSION:

The players began with a warm-up with Assistant Coach, Rui Faria. This was dynamic and static stretching combined with speed and agility work. This lasted for 15 minutes.
After this, the players walked over to the session. There were 20 players taking part in the main session. This did not include the goalkeepers, who were working together alongside the Goalkeeper Coach. The players were split up into two teams, and then split again into four teams of five.
The multi-functional session involved two parts. The two teams of five on the inside played 5v5. The two teams of five on the outside (A and B) did speed, agility work combined with shooting. The first player played two wall passes into the coach, before performing ladder work and going through mannequins and finishing with a shot. After the shot, player retrieved his ball from the goal and joined the back group B. Therefore, groups A and B were constantly rotating so that the players got about 5 shots in. (See diagram below)

 

You can see a short video on the quality of shooting at HTTP://YOUTU.BE/KXEMYV03QTE - look out for the Ronaldo strike at the end.
The group inside playing 5v5 did so inside approximately a 30×15 yard area. The blue team defended the goals marked “A” and the red team defended the goals marked “B”. There was a half-way line which prevented the the players from scoring within their own half. (See diagram below)


TEAM SHAPE:

After a short break, the team then moved across to the other field where the next exercise took place. The goalkeepers joined the team and they set up to play 11v11. The field was organized with a 20×40 grid inside the halfway line. Both teams played a 4-2-3-1 formation and Mourinho carefully explained the patterns that they would work on. After one team finished their pattern play with an attempt on goal, the other team then performed the same pattern on the other goal. (See diagram below)


FIRST PATTERN:

Ball starts with the goalkeeper.
1 – Keeper plays the ball to the right fullback
2 – Right fullback passes to center back
3 – Center back opens up the play and passes to advancing fullback on other side
4 – Left fullback passes ball inside to center midfielder


With these four passes building up the attack, it allows the team to advance further forward as a unit, thus allowing the outside fullbacks to move beyond the halfway line.

5 – Center midfielder plays wide to advancing right back
6 – Right back plays into center forward
7 – Center forward sets attacking midfielder
8 – Attacking midfielder can play either forward who is high up the field.


The four attacking players then combine for a finish, sometimes taking another five passes.

SECOND PATTERN:

The second attacking pattern from play again started from the goalkeeper and worked the ball across the back four initially, allowing the team to push up as a unit.
1 – Keeper played the left back
2 – Left back passes to center back
3 – Center back passes to other center back
4 – 2nd center back plays the ball into the midfield and then goes for the return
5 – Midfielder plays a return to central defender in the midfield zone


Once the central defender ‘bounces’ the ball off the center midfielder
6 – Central defender plays ball into center forward
7 – Center forward drops the ball back to attacking midfielder
8 – Attacking midfielder then plays the ball to either wide forward. Forwards then combine passes for a finish.


The four attacking players then combine for a finish, which sometimes took another five passes.
Both patterns took 10 minutes each.

SMALL SIDED GAME:
The Real Madrid players then took a 3 minute break before resuming on the same field. The six forwards involved in the pattern play before were then split up. Three of them became neutral players in the 7v7 game, while the other three did some functional training on the field adjacent.
The field was reduced and the players played a 7v7 game with 3 neutral players. The neutral players always played for the attacking team and combine with the midfielders for a shot on goal. (See below)


 TACTICAL GAME:

The session finished with a tactical game. Six reds, along with four yellows, played against ten blue players in a tight area. The yellow players were forwards from the earlier sessions and were placed in yellow, as oppose to red like their teammates, in order to highlight their movement. The objective of the game was to play the ball out from the back under pressure, and find the yellow players high up the field. The blue team were ordered to press/pressure the ball in numbers at all times. Even at this level, the success rate was not very high, but the tempo and pressure on the ball put a huge emphasis on movement by the attacking players and it was still all performed at a high level.
After changing the attacking players, along with the reds and blues changing roles, they performed one set each of ten minutes. The players then stretched together for ten minutes before concluding the practice


SESSION 2:

The second session of the day took place at 5pm. Again, the Real Madrid players did a 15 minute warm-up routine with Rui Faria before taking a short water break and playing 8v2′s in a small area for ten minutes. This exercise was designed to get the players loose and was not part of the main session.

1ST EXERCISE:

Players were split into two groups of ten. Five players were inside the grid with a ball each and five players stood outside the grid. On the coaches first whistle, the players inside the grid dribbled around under no pressure for ten seconds. The second whistle allowed the players on the outside to come in and challenge them, only after doing the short explosive exercise at the cones. The players inside the grid had to protect their ball for 10 seconds. On the third whistle, both sides recovered back to their initial starting position. The exercise lasted for four minutes before the players inside and outside the grid changed places. Overall, there were two sets before the players took a break.  (See diagram below)


2ND EXERCISE:

The squad was split into two groups and each one worked inside the 18 yard box. Four reds attacked four blues, with two yellow players acting as neutral players. The objective was to create chances playing in a tight, congested 18 yard box. Different movement patterns were used by the attacking team, while the blues made sure they always pressed the ball and kept a solid line. If the blues did win the ball back, they were to try and keep possession while the red team tried to win it back as quick as possible. This added a transitional aspect to the exercise, which Rui Faria had earlier told us was crucial. (See below)


EXERCISE 3:

The Real Madrid squad then moved on to what looked like a simple possession exercise with target players. However, this was a lot more tactical than I first believed. The target players outside the area (in yellow) were all the defenders – Pepe, Ramos, Arbeloa,Varane etc. The target players instructions were to ‘bounce’ the ball off a player in the middle, and switch the point of attack to another yellow, who would attempt to do the same. With a small area and a lot of players, this would seem like a difficult exercise. However, with the red and blue players both opting to play the ball straight back to a yellow player and let them change the point of attack, it really flowed well.
You can see in the diagram below that the short combination passes (1 and 3) draw in the opposition, while the long passes (2 and 4) open the play up. This is a pattern that you will see time and time again when watching the back four in possession at Real Madrid.


TACTICAL PATTERN PLAY:

The team then moved across to the other field to work on pattern play. Similar to earlier in the day, the attacking team (red) were set up with three attackers playing high and wide, and then with a withdrawn forward so it looked as if they were attacking with four high up the pitch. Blues were set-up to defend with seven players ( a back four with three center midfielders), while the reds attacked with eight (four across the midfield and four high up top).

FIRST PATTERN:

The pattern started with a continuation from the last exercise. The ball went across the back four and ‘bounced’  into the midfielder as the defender then opened up the play to the other side. After this happened three times, the fullback received the ball and looked forward (1) . As he opened up, the outside forward checked out of his area, creating space for the center forward to go in (3). The fullback the played a ball down the line for the forward to come onto and try to get turned (2). When the forward received the ball, the other forwards had already made their way to the box to combine for a finish. (See diagram below)


SECOND PATTERN:

This again involved the ball being circulated across the midfield line for three/four times before the attack started. This time when the full back received the ball (1), he passed it short to the outside forward (2). The outside forward came inside with the ball (3) and the center forward check into space in the channel, creating space (4). The outside forward then played a cross field pass to the other outside forward (5) who had space to create a shot on goal himself, or combine with a supporting player.


The last 15 minutes of training involved a 9v9 game in a small area with plenty of opportunities for attacks and shots on goal. Despite the second session of pre-season training, when Jose Mourinho called time on the game, the players were complaining and begging to continue. I was right there with them. Following two training sessions with this kind of organization and quality, I could have kept watching very easily. Mourinho was having none of it however. 

Tudo retirado daqui.

21 comentários:

Anónimo disse...

Sou um profundo admirador de Mourinho, mais pelo que ele fez do que pelo que faz neste momento e vocês tem ajudado a fundamentar ainda mais a minha opinião, obrigado. Que achaste destas 2 sessões ? Sei que não são apologistas de jogadas padrão mas não serão elas necessários em certos momentos do jogo ? Qual a importância do exercício em que passam a escada, contornam os manequins e rematam sem oposição sem nada ? Faz isto só porque tem tempo para o fazer ou é ganha algo com isso ? É que consigo ver isto num treino de míudos 8/9anos não em séniores como os do RM.
Esperava algo mais, algo diferente. Atenção sou um leigo nisto do treino, apenas amo o jogo.

António Henriques

Jorge Carolo disse...

É interessante ver que alguns dos automatismos do Real de Mourinho foram resultado dos exercícios presentes neste post.

Baggio, gostava de saber a tua opinião quanto aos padrões que Mourinho fez na 1ª sessão? Estás de acordo que se faça aquele tipo de exercício sem adversário?

Obrigado

Roberto Baggio disse...

"Sei que não são apologistas de jogadas padrão mas não serão elas necessários em certos momentos do jogo ? "

Depende do que entendes por jogadas padrão. Assim, como estas que Mourinho faz, eu discordo.

" Qual a importância do exercício em que passam a escada, contornam os manequins e rematam sem oposição sem nada ? "

Isto é a pré-temporada. Primeiras semanas do período pré-competitivo. Os exercícios que citas têm em vista o ganho de capacidades físicas gerais para o futebol. Para que os jogadores se preparem para o esforço das semanas de treino seguinte.

"Estás de acordo que se faça aquele tipo de exercício sem adversário?"

Não estou de acordo que se faça este tipo de exercícios. Ainda estou menos de acordo que se faça sem adversário.

DC disse...

Mesmo aquela padronização da saída de bola desde a área és contra?

Desporto ESE disse...
Este comentário foi removido pelo autor.
Roberto Baggio disse...

Sim DC, mesmo essas.

Sou apologistas de que se criem referências do tipo: Quero que a bola entre nos médios no corredor central, em condições para enquadrar. Ou quero que a bola entre nos laterais em condições de progredir e entregar nos médios mais acima. O percurso que a bola faz até lá? Pode ser preciso um passe, ou 20. Dependendo da forma como a oposição se coloca. Aquilo é, passe para este, para aquele, para outro.... e se não der?

DC disse...

Pois, sujeita-se sempre a ter um adversário com a equipa bem estudada e jogadores inseguros sem as jogadas "programadas".

Como treinarias tu a equipa para se adaptar na saída de bola. Recordo-me do que VP fez a JJ, que acabou por ser uma das diferenças decisivas para o Porto ter a bola e o Benfica não. Como é que adaptas uma equipa a isso? Mais jogadores preparados para vir buscar?

Anónimo disse...

Não sou um entendido em futebol, mas sou um entendido em métodos de treino. Dito isto darei uma opinião sobre o o "tal" exercício sem defesa no que toca ao meu conhecimento sobre o treino numa modalidade como o basquetebol.
Na minha opinião é um exercício que melhora competências em termos de técnica individual ofensiva, aliadas ao trabalho de capacidades físicas tais como a coordenação, como tal se o exercício tivesse este objectivo parece muito bem. Agora se o objectivo do treinador é trabalhar as competências técnicas e tácticas, então a presença de defesa, ou de uma situação de leitura de jogo, seria fundamental.

Na minha modalidade o trabalho dos fundamentos é feito ao longo de toda a carreira de um atleta, desde a formação à Liga ACB, à NBA. Um atleta do mais alto nível, tomemos o exemplo do Lebron James, desde os 7/8 anos até aos dias de hoje, realiza este tipo de exercícios vezes sem conta.

Se estou errado em relação ao futebol, desde já as minhas desculpas.

Obrigado pelo excelente blog!!
Continuem o bom trabalho.

Saudações desportivas

Roberto Baggio disse...

Anónimo,

Sim. A um nível muito básico, estimula a coordenação, e outras capacidades físicas, mas com estímulos muito básicos.
Abraço

Dennis Bergkamp disse...

Ainda ontem estava a ler o "the talent code" (recomendo vivamente)e os gajos comprovam por estudos cientificos o que já a muito se sabia. Só evoluis na dificuldade. Se o que fazes é fácil.. não tens de te esforçar para conseguir o sucesso.. então não vais evoluir, não vais aprender nada.

Eles dão o exemplo dos coletes salva vidas nos aviões. As hospedeiras estão lá a explicar como se faz, e está tudo a ver. Elas dizem "têm de colocar não sei o que, puxar as cordas blablabla"


Agora imaginem uma situação de emergência em que é realmente necessário a utilização do colete salva vidas.

O tempo que as pessoas iriam demorar era X.

Se, ao verem a hospedeira explicar, todgente estivesse a realmente vestir os coletes, em caso de emergência as pessoas iriam demorar bem menos tempo a estar prontas.

Esta é a diferença entre um treinador dar uma palestra de 1h e acreditar que os jogadores vão aprender a jogar em 4-4-2 "los angeles" ou... eles vivênciarem esse jogar no treino, como acham que iria ser a aquisição de comportamentos, e mais importante ainda... a afinidade com as pistas que o jogo dá para jogar para aqui ou para ali?

Subindo o nivel.

Comparem vestir o colete salva vidas na calminha, ou ... vestir o colete num simulador com imensa agitação, tudo aos berros e malta a ter ataques de panico. Será que era igual? ou muito mais próximo da realidade?

No treino seria a diferença entre o que se viu ali em cima naquele exercício em que eles chegavam ao meio sem oposição, ou... ser uma situação de 5x3 em que o objectivo era a bola chegar aos corredores com espaço para progredir.

Artur Semedo disse...

Luís Castro, hoje: "Queríamos treinar mais, não ter jogos tão próximos uns dos outros, o que nos traria a tal estabilidade. Felizmente, não podemos treinar. Estamos em todas as competições e isso leva a que não haja tempo para treinar mais. Neste momento, o treino passa pela visualização de imagens e pela comunicação aos jogadores do que pretendemos, que não é a mesma coisa de estar no terreno."

Roberto Baggio disse...

Artur Semedo,

Tudo certo.

artur semedo disse...

quanto a isso das ditas "jogadas padronizadas" ou "estudadas", faz-me lembrar as cadeiras universitárias de teorias gerais de ensino-aprendizagem.
a um nível mais simples, tínhamos a pedagogia do conhecimento, a qual consistia no "saber saber", isto é, em transmitir conhecimento puro (no futebol, seria qualquer coisa como saber o que é uma recepção, o que é um passe, o que é o drible, etc.) depois, vinha a pedagogia dos objectivos, cuja ideia fulcral era o "saber fazer", ou seja, conseguir operacionalizar o conhecimento adquirido (seguindo o mesmo raciocínio, saber fazer uma recepção, saber fazer um passe, saber fazer um drible). por fim, vinha a pedagogia das competências, resumida no princípio do "saber tornar-se", que é como quem diz orientar o aluno para que este desenvolva as competências necessárias para dar resposta a problemas inéditos. resumindo, a competência é o acúmulo do “saber saber” (teoria), do “saber fazer” (prática), e ainda do ser capaz de associar tudo isso de forma original, na prospectiva de que, ao longo de toda a vida, o indivíduo seja capaz de “saber tonar-se”, de se adaptar a diferentes contextos. apenas se consegue exercitar essas capacidades no aluno recorrendo a conceitos operativos mais complexos (como, por ex., analisar, ou julgar).
no futebol, e como já por diversas vezes afirmaram, depois de se ensinar a fazer a recepção, o passe, o drible (dando de barato que saber o que sejam esses movimentos é banal), quando os jogadores em formação já dominam a técnica, portanto, tudo o que seja jogo é um exercício em prol do desenvolvimento de competências, e só isso os poderá tornar melhores, porque é no jogo, mais ou menos complexo, que eles utilizam os conceitos operativos mais elevados. se um treinador, seja em que escalão, padroniza um movimento no treino, não passa do mero "saber fazer", repetição mecanizada que em nada acrescentará às capacidades cognitivas do jogador, pois ele limitar-se-á a decorar que a bola vai do guarda-redes para o X para o Y para o Z, naquele determinado exercício - isto é similar a uma turma que fizesse um ditado, e, depois de corrigidos os erros, fosse obrigada a realizar o número necessário de cópias até que soubesse de cor todo o texto; os alunos aprenderiam o léxico, a ortografia e a sintaxe daquele texto, mas nenhum deles se teria tornado capaz de se expressar individualmente; para tal serviria, mais tarde, a composição, raramente livre a 100%, por haver sempre certas regras a cumprir (não mais que n linhas, por ex.), que é como quem diz, o jogo, espécie de composição em que as ligações colectivas ganham expressão.

artur semedo disse...

ora, se uma equipa a defender é capaz de cobrir, de forma eficaz (= resposta rápida), uma porção relativamente baixa da totalidade da área de um campo, pelo que, teoricamente, sobraria sempre muito espaço... as possibilidades de distribuição dessa porção são quase infinitas e, dentro dessas possibilidades, as melhores implicam que o movimento do guarda-redes para o X para o Y para o Z que a equipa atacante tão afincadamente treinou fique bloqueado. se uma equipa treinar amiúde jogadas padronizadas, julgo evidente que será menos provável que os seus elementos, perante uma situação inédita, tenham capacidade de análise e julgamento para, recorrendo às suas ferramentas técnicas, solucionarem o problema da melhor forma em tempo útil. isto porque, penso eu, se a equipa realizou tais exercícios e, fazendo-o conforme exigido, recebeu retorno positivo, então a resposta mais natural será tentar fazer semelhante ao treino, e demorará mais tempo a pensar nas alternativas. se só se treinar assim, então temos os josés motas desta vida… se, por outro lado, o treinador orientar os jogadores segundo uma filosofia do género “as regras do jogo são estas, quero jogadores aqui e ali, depois fazei como vos parecer melhor”, como quem diz, padroniza a multiplicação de opções, não os movimentos, então temos o que se disse aqui, nomeadamente no §6.º
peço desculpa pela verborreia anterior, mas hoje ainda não consegui atingir a minha dose necessária de proteína, e não consigo ultrapassar a existência do quaresma no plantel portista…

Bernardo disse...

"Sou apologistas de que se criem referências do tipo: Quero que a bola entre nos médios no corredor central, em condições para enquadrar. Ou quero que a bola entre nos laterais em condições de progredir e entregar nos médios mais acima. O percurso que a bola faz até lá? Pode ser preciso um passe, ou 20. Dependendo da forma como a oposição se coloca."

a propósito desta frase do baggio, que concordo inteiramente, deixo aqui este vídeo que acho que corresponde à mesma visão.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1VJD2ZtVSY

Pedro Afonso disse...

Bom dia a todo, acabei de ler o artigo e respectivos comentários na diagonal e concordo com praticamente tudo que se disse, no entanto queria levantar algumas questoes:
1-"O exercicio das escadas e manequins" nem tudo que se faz no treino tem como objetivo o tactico, tecnica e fisico (o que foi dito anteriormente relativamente a essas vertentes esta correcto). O facto de estarmos a analisar esse exercicio fora de contexto pode nos levar ao erro, muita das vezes o treinador recorre a esse tipo de exercicio por uma questao de cultura do propio jogador. O jogador foi habituado desde pequeno a um pre-aquecimento mais analitico e mesmo com o passar dos anos dificilmente consegue alterar esses habitos (ja estive perante estas situacoes). Deixo aqui um excerto de uma entrevista ao xavi saida este mes na revista francessa sofoot (..faz 15 anos que sou proffisional e nunca passei um dia sem fazer um meinho...quando saio de casa para ir treinar ja visualizo o meinho que vou fazer....quando sou chamado a selecao..quando nao ha meinho no programa de treino ha problemas com o preparador fisico...Mentalmente nao me sinto bem ...sinto me mais feliz. com o meinho e quando tou feliz é mais dificil ter lesoes..).

2-"Jogadas Padrão" Mais uma vez digo que é dificil avaliarmos um exercicio apenas pela forma "fisica" dele, os feedback que la se dizem para mim sao a essencia do exercicio. Por exemplo um treinador pode calibrar uma das equipa a fazer umas jogadas padrao do proximo adversario e compreender o seu funcionamento enquanto a outra equipa joga com os nossos principios de jogo e tenta dar resposta aos problemas imposto. Por outro lado jogadas padrao sao usadas para a equipa ter pontos de referencia mas isso nao pode ser entendido como algo negativo. Estamos a falar de uma equipa de elite os jogadores sabem perfeitamente que nao podem cair constantemente no automatismo, o desemvolvimento do automatismo é utilizado normalmente para diminuir o tempo da resposta isso é a informacao recolhida pelos jogadores nem chega a ser tratada pelo seu cerebro e acaba por dar rapidamente uma resposta tabelada, apesar de a equipa perder imprevisibilidade ganha na velocidade de execucao.

Fico me por aqui que isto de teclar num tablet nao ta com nada...

Roberto Baggio disse...

" os jogadores sabem perfeitamente que nao podem cair constantemente no automatismo"

Sabem? Será mesmo que o sabem?
E mesmo admitindo que o sabem, por exemplo e indo ao absurdo, se não treinam alternativas como é que funciona esse saber?

Cumprimentos, e obrigado pelas boas questões levantadas

Pedro Afonso disse...

Quando me refiro ao saberem, estou a considerar o facto de serem jogadores de nivel mundial. Do saber ao executar ai é outra historia. Dai analisar uma secao de treino isolada pode nos levar ao erro e por acaso termos apanhado uma seccao que proporciona o treino dessas vertentes. É dificil encontrar o equilibrio entre o treino de automatismos e o treino da creatividade\ imprevisibilidade. Acredito que a chave esta no encontrar o equilibrio entre esses facores.

Tywin Lannister disse...

A propósito de outra pesquisa, acerca da Footbonaut, acabei por dar de caras com este artigo publicado no sítio oficial do Liverpool FC:

How Bill Shankly changed training
http://www.liverpoolfc.com/news/latest-news/144161-how-bill-shankly-changed-training


Ficam aqui alguns excertos:

«But from the day Shankly arrived at Liverpool, training at Melwood was planned scrupulously -– and endless road-running was not on the agenda.

Every last act was considered and everything was mapped out on intricate, tabulated sheets, which would be circulated around his members of staff.»

Onde é que já vimos isto...?


«"Everything we do here is for a purpose," Shankly would warn his players. "It has been tried and tested and it is so simple that anybody can understand it. But if you think it is so simple that it is not worth doing, then you are wrong. The simple things are the ones that count."

Slowly but surely, Shankly made sure his methods and messages permeated the club and the squad.


Before any training session, Reuben Bennett would lead the warm-up for roughly half an hour before the strenuous work began, because, as Shankly succinctly put it: "You wouldn't rev up your car to the hilt when you first started driving it in the morning or you might blow a gasket."

Once the players were warmed up, they were split into groups of six -– lettered A to F.

Each team would be put through different functions simultaneously. So while A might focus on skipping or weight training, C would be working on jumping and E on abdominal exercises.

Circuit training would make Melwood a hive of flurried yet coordinated activity –- and Shankly would oversee every routine, sounding his whistle to keep the players moving from one task to another.»

Onde é que já vimos isto...?


«Players were said to have been taken aback when he ordered them to train with the ball at their feet.»

Estávamos em 1959... E provavelmente já fazia isto há muito mais tempo...


«It's hard to imagine now, but something that is so fundamental to the training of players was a largely uncommon occurrence.

But Shankly drilled them on how to move the ball; –how to drive it, chip it, control it and even head it.»

Nada de extraordinário aqui.


«"We brought out the training boards," said Shankly. "They would be set up about 15 yards apart and would keep the ball in play and keep the players on the move all the time.

"If the ball beat the goalkeeper, it would hit a board and be back in play again.»

Onde é que já vimos isto?


«"We also had a 'sweat box', using boards like the walls of a house, with players playing the ball off the wall on to the next, a similar movement to the ones I used to see Tommy Finney practise at the back of the strand at Preston.

"The ball was played against the boards; you controlled it, turned around, and took it again."

Shankly's training sessions were constantly evolving, but they needed to be foolproof and he needed to know they would have the desired effect.

So one day, he decided to put his new method of training boards to the test and asked for Hunt, one of the fittest players within the ranks, to act as guinea pig.

Placing the boards 15 yards apart, Hunt was ordered to play the ball against one of the boards, take it, control it, turn, dribble up to the other board with just 10 touches of the ball. He'd then turn, repeat the exercise –- and keep turning and repeating.

"We wanted to know how long this function should last," explained Shankly. "We were probing. After 45 seconds, Roger, who was as strong as a bull, turned ashen and I said: 'That will do, son.'»

Ainda o inventor da footbonaut ainda não era nascido...


«"Later Roger could do that exercise for two minutes."»


CONTINUA...

Tywin Lannister disse...

CONTINUAÇÃO:


«This method of drilling players and stretching them to their capacity was applied elsewhere.

Rather than five-a-side games, three-a-side games would break out on pitches 45 yards long and 25 yards wide. The players would play five minutes each way and they would become so tired, play would have to halt.»

Os "cinco para cada lado" já eram muito utilizados aquando da sua passagem pelo Grimsby Town. ;)


«But the exercises would continue with military precision and soon the boys could play in trios on wide pitches for half an hour and not be fatigued.

After all this was done, Shankly would round the day's events off with five-a-side matches. He'd join in with the players and battle against them like he was vying for a place in the team. Story has it he would even keep the game in full flow until his side won, such was his competitive streak.

"Enjoy yourselves, boys," the great man would say.»


De outra fonte, retirei isto:

«Shankly insisted on suitable cooling-off periods after training (now called "warming down") before the players took a bath and had a meal. The team changed the studs in their boots to suit all playing conditions. Shankly summarised the entire strategy as: "attention to detail; we never left anything to chance".»

«As always, Shankly kept things simple and Twentyman was told to look for a prospect's basic qualities which were the abilities to pass the ball and move into position to receive a pass. Shankly also wanted Twentyman to check the player's personality and ensure he had the right attitude for a professional footballer. Above all, said Twentyman, "he wanted to know if the lad had the heart to play for Liverpool". Although Shankly sometimes paid large transfer fees he was loath to do so and Twentyman's brief was "getting them young so he (Shankly) could mould them into what he wanted"»

Shankly era também adepto dos "mind games", usando vários truques para motivar os seus jogadores, mas esta parte não faz parte do âmbito deste blogue.


«This method of drilling players and stretching them to their capacity was applied elsewhere.

Rather than five-a-side games, three-a-side games would break out on pitches 45 yards long and 25 yards wide. The players would play five minutes each way and they would become so tired, play would have to halt.»

Os "cinco para cada lado" já eram muito utilizados aquando da sua passagem pelo Grimsby Town. ;)


«But the exercises would continue with military precision and soon the boys could play in trios on wide pitches for half an hour and not be fatigued.

After all this was done, Shankly would round the day's events off with five-a-side matches. He'd join in with the players and battle against them like he was vying for a place in the team. Story has it he would even keep the game in full flow until his side won, such was his competitive streak.

"Enjoy yourselves, boys," the great man would say.»


De outra fonte, retirei isto:

«Shankly insisted on suitable cooling-off periods after training (now called "warming down") before the players took a bath and had a meal. The team changed the studs in their boots to suit all playing conditions. Shankly summarised the entire strategy as: "attention to detail; we never left anything to chance".»

«As always, Shankly kept things simple and Twentyman was told to look for a prospect's basic qualities which were the abilities to pass the ball and move into position to receive a pass. Shankly also wanted Twentyman to check the player's personality and ensure he had the right attitude for a professional footballer. Above all, said Twentyman, "he wanted to know if the lad had the heart to play for Liverpool". Although Shankly sometimes paid large transfer fees he was loath to do so and Twentyman's brief was "getting them young so he (Shankly) could mould them into what he wanted"»

CONTINUA...

Tywin Lannister disse...

CONTINUAÇÃO:

Shankly era também adepto dos "mind games", usando vários truques para motivar os seus jogadores, mas esta parte não faz parte do âmbito deste blogue.


Mais um pouquinho, de outra fonte:

«Liverpool's style under Bill Shankly was simple on the surface, but was based on a detailed idealogy and training whose objective was to get the best out of the players.

We had devised a system of play which minimized the risk of injuries. The team played in sections of the field, like a relay. We didn't want players running the length of the field, stretching themselves unnecessarily, so our back men played in one area, and then passed on to the midfield men in their area, and so on to the front men. So, whilst there was always room for individuals within our system, the work was shared out.»

It was no accident that during my time at Anfield eight players played more than three hundred League matches - Ian Callaghan 502, Chris Lawler 396, Roger Hunt 384, Peter Thompson 377, Tommy Smith 367, Ron Yeats 359, Ian St John 335 and Tommy Lawrence 305. Emlyn Hughes, who had played 264 League matches during my time, is now well past the 300 mark and Ray Clemence, Kevin Keegan and Steve Heighway are among those well on the way. We didn't believe in resting players simply because we had a heavy programme of matches. We wouldn't put in young players who were not familiar with the pattern and who would consequently put extra pressure on the rest of the team." (...)

In the 1974 F.A. Cup Final, the world of football was given a sneak preview of what was just around the corner in the World Cup Finals just two months away. Liverpool's performance in their demolition job of Newcastle United was as clinical a display of 'Total football' as any ever put on by the Dutch masters at international level. The 3:0 scoreline hardly flattered such a virtuoso performance. Overlapping full-backs, one touch play, every man comfortable on the ball, all the hallmarks of Shankly's pass and move, keep it simple philosophy were on display for the world to admire and it brought Liverpool the F.A. Cup for the second time in their history. Liverpool's play that day was the final fullfilment for Shankly (...).»

Para quem tiver tempo de ver:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWbF307EtXw



Não é difícil de compreender a quem José Mourinho, mas não só, foi buscar inspiração, em certos aspectos, do que se deve fazer no treino, em função da filosofia e modelo de jogo. Bill Shankly sabia muito bem o que queria e sabia muito bem o que fazia.


Como vocês aqui no Lateral Esquerdo não têm ainda nenhuma etiqueta dedicada ao grande Bill Shankly, têm aqui um pretexto para a "inaugurar". ;)


E um grande bem haja por nos tornarem menos ignorantes nesta coisa linda que se chama futebol.